Tag Archives: Michael Fassbender

The Golden Globes, winners, losers and a few surprises! #film #awards #hollywood

13 Jan

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Well what a night it was last night. The first really big milestone (which most of the world is interested in – probably more because of the fashion than the film sadly!)  in the road to the Oscars. There were some expected big winners – Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave picking up the coveted Best Film award, Jennifer Lawrence scooping Best Supporting Actress, putting her front of the queue for an Oscar second year in a row, Cate Blanchette for her tour de force masterpiece in Blue Jasmine and Leonardo Di Caprio for his outstanding performance as Jordan Belfort in The Wolf of Wall Street (this picked up Best Actor in the Musical or Comedy section). It was also great to see Alfonso Cuaron picking up the Best Director award for the technically astonishing Gravity, the only other real contender to pip Steve McQueen to the Oscar post later this year – that will be an interesting race!Screen Shot 2014-01-13 at 11.11.25

There were however a few surprises – which were totally deserved if not initially predicted. Firstly Matthew McConaughey picked up Best Actor for his role in Dallas Buyers Club, something I thought was slightly missed off the BAFTA radar, but to be fair is going to be released in February so its understandable why its not yet nominated on this side of the pond, never the less greatly recognised in Hollywood and makes the Oscars race that little bit more unpredictable. I was however hoping for Chiwetel Ejiofor to scoop the Best Dramatic Actor award for 12 Years A Slave, and also something for Michael Fassbender in a supporting category, but they were both content supporting their director as he, rather unprepared and breathlessly accepted the Best Film win (as if he was really THAT surprised!) Screen Shot 2014-01-13 at 11.07.41

Anyway, win, lose, it looked like a fantastic night with American Hustle doing very well and some of our homegrown talent being recognised across the pond – Idris you did very well!!!

What did you think of the Award winners, happy? Surprised? Annoyed? Let me know in the comments below, but for now, I’ll leave you with the full list of winners including the TV categories too (well done Breaking Bad and Michael Douglas for Behind the Candelabra!)

Film

Best Drama – 12 Years a Slave
Best Comedy/Musical – American Hustle
Best Actor in a Motion Picture (Drama): Matthew McConaughey – Dallas Buyers Club
Best Actor in a Motion Picture (Comedy/Musical): Leonardo DiCaprio –The Wolf of Wall Street
Best Actress in a Motion Picture (Drama): Cate Blanchett – Blue Jasmine
Best Actress in a Motion Picture (Comedy/Musical): Amy Adams –American Hustle
Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture:  Jared Leto – Dallas Buyers Club
Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture:  Jennifer Lawrence –American Hustle
Best Director: Alfonso Cuaron – Gravity
Best Original Screenplay: Spike Jonze – Her
Best Foreign Language Film: The Great Beauty
Best Animated Film: Frozen
Best Score: Alex Ebert – All Is Lost
Best Song: “Ordinary Love” – Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom

TV

Best TV Series (Drama): Breaking Bad
Best TV Series (Comedy): Brooklyn Nine-Nine
Best Actor in a TV Series (Drama): Bryan Cranston – Breaking Bad
Best Actor in a TV Series (Drama): Robin Wright – House of Cards
Best Actor in a TV Series (Comedy): Andy Samberg – Brooklyn Nine-Nine
Best Actor in a TV Series (Comedy): Amy Poehler – Parks And Recreation
Best Mini-Series or TV Movie: Behind The Candelabra
Best Actor in a Mini-Series or TV Movie: Michael Douglas – Behind The Candelabra
Best Actress in a Mini-Series or TV Movie: Elisabeth Moss – Top Of The Lake
Best Supporting Actor in a TV Series, Mini-Series, or TV Movie: Jon Voight – Ray Donovan
Best Supporting Actress in a TV Series, Mini-Series, or TV Movie: Jacqueline Bisset – Dancing On The Edge

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The London Critics Circle Film Awards announces its nominees! #film #filmtalent #movie #awards

17 Dec

 

Screen Shot 2013-12-17 at 14.02.52Celebrating the world of movies is starting to pick up pace with yet more awards announcements. The London Critics Circle Film Awards nominations are out and it looks like the fantastic 12 Years a Slave will lead the pack. In my mind its hard to see who will beat this for Best Film, Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor, however there are some strong competitors in Tom Hanks and surprisingly (but great!) Michael Douglas in Behind the Candelabra. It is however a huge shame not to see Idris Elba up there for what may well be the performance of his career in Mandela: The Long Walk to Freedom, but unsurprisingly Naomi Harris is garnering much more buzz as Winnie.

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The race is still however wide open and there is definitely a long road to the Oscars, but these awards let us also celebrate some other great film offerings, my favourites have to be Filth in the best British film category, and great to see some nods for The Selfish Giant and the touching and superbly acted Philomena.

Here’s the list of nominations, who is your money riding on?

FILM OF THE YEAR
Blue Is The Warmest Colour
Blue Jasmine
Frances Ha
Gravity
The Great Beauty
Her
Inside Llewyn Davis
Nebraska
12 Years A Slave
The Wolf Of Wall Street

FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM OF THE YEAR
Blue Is The Warmest Colour
Caesar Must Die
Gloria
The Great Beauty
A Hijacking

BRITISH FILM OF THE YEAR
A Field In England
Filth
Philomena
Rush
The Selfish Giant

DOCUMENTARY OF THE YEAR
The Act Of Killing
Beware Of Mr Baker
Leviathan
Stories We Tell
We Steal Secrets: The Story Of WikiLeaks

ACTOR OF THE YEAR
Bruce Dern – Nebraska
Leonardo DiCaprio – The Wolf Of Wall Street
Michael Douglas – Behind The Candelabra
Chiwetel Ejiofor – 12 Years A Slave
Tom Hanks – Captain Phillips

ACTRESS OF THE YEAR
Cate Blanchett – Blue Jasmine
Sandra Bullock – Gravity
Judi Dench – Philomena
Adèle Exarchopoulos – Blue Is The Warmest Colour
Greta Gerwig – Frances Ha

SUPPORTING ACTOR OF THE YEAR
Barkhad Abdi – Captain Phillips
Michael Fassbender – 12 Years A Slave
James Gandolfini – Enough Said
Tom Hanks – Saving Mr Banks
Jared Leto – Dallas Buyers Club

SUPPORTING ACTRESS OF THE YEAR
Naomie Harris – Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom
Sally Hawkins – Blue Jasmine
Jennifer Lawrence – American Hustle
Lupita Nyong’o – 12 Years A Slave
June Squibb – Nebraska

BRITISH ACTOR OF THE YEAR
Christian Bale – American Hustle / Out Of the Furnace
Steve Coogan – Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa / The Look of Love / Philomena / What Maisie Knew
Chiwetel Ejiofor – 12 Years A Slave
Michael Fassbender – The Counsellor / 12 Years A Slave
James McAvoy – Filth / Trance / Welcome To The Punch

BRITISH ACTRESS OF THE YEAR
Judi Dench – Philomena
Lindsay Duncan – About Time / Last Passenger / Le Week-End
Naomie Harris – Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom
Sally Hawkins – Blue Jasmine
Emma Thompson – Beautiful Creatures / Saving Mr Banks

YOUNG BRITISH PERFORMER OF THE YEAR
Conner Chapman – The Selfish Giant
Saoirse Ronan – Byzantium / The Host / How I Live Now
Eloise Laurence – Broken
George MacKay – Breakfast With Jonny Wilkinson / For Those In Peril / How I Live Now / Sunshine On Leith
Shaun Thomas – The Selfish Giant

DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR
Alfonso Cuarón – Gravity
Paul Greengrass – Captain Phillips
Steve McQueen – 12 Years A Slave
Paolo Sorrentino – The Great Beauty
Martin Scorsese – The Wolf Of Wall Street

SCREENWRITER OF THE YEAR
Ethan Coen & Joel Coen – Inside Llewyn Davis
Spike Jonze – Her
Steve Coogan & Jeff Pope – Philomena
John Ridley – 12 Years A Slave
Terence Winter – The Wolf Of Wall Street

BREAKTHROUGH BRITISH FILMMAKER
Jon S Baird – Filth
Scott Graham – Shell
Marcus Markou – Papadopoulos & Sons
Rufus Norris – Broken
Paul Wright – For Those In Peril

TECHNICAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
American Hustle – Judy Becker, production design
Behind The Candelabra – Howard Cummings, production design
Filth – Mark Eckersley, editing
Frances Ha – Sam Levy, cinematography
Gravity – Tim Webber, visual effects
The Hunger Games: Catching Fire – Trish Summerville, costumes
Inside Llewyn Davis – T Bone Burnett, music
Stoker – Kurt Swanson & Bart Mueller, costumes
12 Years A Slave – Sean Bobbitt, cinematography
Upstream Colour – Johnny Marshall, sound design

DILYS POWELL AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN FILM
Gary Oldman

XMen – Days of Future Past – New Stills #film #xmen #exclusive

6 Nov

We may have to wait until 2014 for the film to come out, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t plenty of time for some teasing from the studios. Here we go with some hot off the press character posters.

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And if you can’t wait to find out what’s in store, here’s a quick synopsis for you…

The ultimate X-Men ensemble fights a war for the survival of the species across two time periods in X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST. The beloved characters from the original “X-Men” film trilogy join forces with their younger selves from “X-Men: First Class,” in an epic battle that must change the past – to save our future.

 

 

Missing the Fass? Well he’s back in the new trailer for The Counsellor #film #filmtrailer

20 Aug

Fass fans fear not, he’s back in this slick looking tale of a lawyer (Fassbender), who finds himself in over his head when he gets involved in drug trafficking.

From Sir Ridley Scott, The Counsellor stars Michael Fassbender, Penélope Cruz, Cameron Diaz, Javier Bardem, Brad Pitt

Enjoy!

 

Brand new stills from The Counsellor #film #movie

2 Jul

Here you go film fans, some brand new pics from Michael Fassbenders new film The Counsellor. The film tells the story of a lawyer (Fassbender), who finds himself in over his head when he gets involved in drug trafficking. Starring alongside The Fass is a star studded cast including:  Penélope Cruz, Cameron Diaz, Javier Bardem and Brad Pitt.

It hits cinemas soon and will definitely be one to watch!

Cameron Diaz and Penelope Cruz in The Counsellor Michael Fassbender and Javier Bardem in The Counsellor Michael Fassbender in The Counsellor Michael Fassbender in The Counsellor2 Penelope Cruz in The Counsellor

 

 

 

A night of glamour at The London Critics Circle Awards

21 Jan

What a way to kick off January than bringing a little bit of glitz and glamour to the good old BFI Southbank.

Fresh from their stint at the Golden Globes, stars such as Jean DuJardin and Michael Fassbender stylishly walked the red carpet ready to see who was the critics favourite from all on offer throughout 2011. What was great about the night is that as well as some of the expected wins – The Artist for Best Film, Michael Fassbender for best Actor – there were also some great unexpected wins – Craig Roberts (Submarine), Best Young Performer and Andrew Haigh (Weekend) Best Directorial Debut. The biggest surprise of the night, was not Craig Robert’s reaction to Michael Fassbender in shame – see video below – but that for the first time in its history, there was a joint win for best actress – Meryl Streep (The Iron Lady) and Anna Paquin (Margaret). Sadly however neither of which showed up to collect their award which is a shame.

So before the awards themselves kicked off, I was in my winter warmers on the red carpet to find out just how all the nominees were feeling about being part of this special night. Here’s what a few of them had to say….

Warhorse’s Jeremy Irvine 

Asif Kapadia – The Director of Senna 

Michel Hazanavicius – The Director of The Artist 

Michael Smiley – Kill List 

John Boyega – Attack the Block 

Jean DuJardin – The Artist

Carol Morley and Zawe Ashton – Dreams of a Life

Luc Roeg – We Need to Talk About Kevin 

Manish Pandey – Writer, Senna 

A great night, some fab interviews and well done to all the winners!

 

David Cronenberg’s Dangerous Disaster

26 Oct

So the end of the festival is imminent. As of Monday my personal work there was done. It was a fantastic festival – huge highs and not so many lows. Things were going almost perfectly until I watched A Dangerous Method. Having been routing for Keira Knightley to finally stick her two fingers up at audiences who think she’s nothing more than a pretty face, I would have thought taking on such a daring role as Sabina Speilrein in David Cronenberg’s (The Fly) A Dangerous Method would finally prove the world wrong. Oh no, instead how wrong Cronenberg must have been to have thought she could have taken on this role in the first place. Unfortunately along with Cronenberg’s made for TV movie styling of the film, her performance was, for me the most problematic of this overall awful film. However having left the screening with some people liking not only the film itself but her performance, I decided to scour the internet to read other reviews (from Venice) on the film – luckily I found I was not alone in my sentiments.

This particular blog  written by Thomas Grimshaw from Shooting People’s blog actually took the words right out of my mouth, so I thought rather than ramble on and double up on inefficient workload, I would, in this particular instance, just point you in the direction of his wise words instead. Such a shame – I really was hoping for more with this film – but here you go…

Thomas Grimshaw ask’s David Cronenberg what the christ went wrong?! 

When it was announced that David Cronenberg was to direct the screen adaptation of Christopher Hampton’s play The Talking Cure, there was a palpable buzz in the air. Given Cronenberg’s history of producing idiosyncratic and rigorously intellectual films with a taste for the psychoanalytic, the idea that he was to venture forth into the combative relationship between Freud and Jung was a tantalisingly sexy prospect. Set in turn of the century Vienna, A Dangerous Method details the relationship between psychoanalysists Carl Jung, Sigmund Freud and a disturbed young woman named Sabina, who will later become the renowned female psychoanalysist Sabina Speilrein. When Jung begins an affair with the girl, the fallout ruptures the relationship between the two men and sets them both on different ideological paths; Freud in favour of a treatment rooted in scientific method whilst Jung drifts towards a counsel of hypothetical mysticism.

Given all we know about the film there was hope of this giving rise to a jamboree of sexual peccadilloes, strained Germanic accents, death and an air of haughty perversion.  The question that must be asked then, is, what in Christ’s name went wrong? The fact that I was unable to determine whether this was in fact a comedy or not seems as good a place to start as any. Admittedly I laughed: lots in fact, but the stoic, hardened faces of its cast whilst delivering its diluted crib-notes on psychoanalysis and shamanism seemed at odds with the bountiful laughter occurring around me.  That said, Cronenberg has always garnished even his most disturbing work with a perverse sense of humour, however if that same fact applies to A Dangerous Method it would appear that Cronenberg’s idea of comedy has regressed to that of a child learning about the birds and the bees.  The other fairly major stumbling block is that for a film so concerned with the concept of sex, is how unbelievably impotent the whole affair feels. Apart from Sabina getting herself royally spanked by an over eager Jung, the film barely visualises the topic that get Freud and Jung all hot and heavy in the first place, instead restricting it to the world of musty drawing rooms where the smell of sex is nowhere near as potent as the smoke emanating from Freud’s phallic cigar.

Despite the initial guffaws that surrounded the casting of Nordic cave-dweller Viggo Mortensen as the elderly, bearded Freud, he’s actually one of the only actors to leave the film with their dignity intact, instead he seemingly has a blast subverting everyone’s expectations by delivering every line with a cock of the head and an ironic twinkle in his eye. Keira Knightley as Sabina fares much worse, when we first see her; screaming and contorting her body with such vigorous abandon she seems in fear of wrenching the whole film from its sprockets and cart-wheeling off down the road with it. Strangely though it’s Michael Fassbinder as the central figure Jung who comes off worst. Although not as violently grating as Knightley, at least the screen is somewhat illuminated by her schizophrenic energy, with Fassbinder the film comes to a stop; not so much a performance but a black hole of inertia that threatens to entropy everything in its path. After his charismatic turn in Shame it really is profoundly stunning that the man has managed to produce a performance of such claustrophobic tedium.  Finally, there is Vincent Cassel whose only purpose seems to be to demonstrate the compulsive, hedonistic pleasure principle (perfect casting) of Freud’s most famous concept. We know this because he uses cocaine and talks about his many, many mistresses; he couldn’t be more obvious if he had ‘id’ branded across his forehead. At least he has the decency to disappear within the first half an hour.

It really is incredibly perplexing how awful this film is at times, Cronenberg has definitely had his misfires over the years, but it’s certainly rare for a director of such regard to sink to such amateurish depths within only a short space of time, although History of Violence was serviceable; displaying moments of wit and genuine danger, Eastern Promises heralded a dramatic downturn in his talents and with A Dangerous Method now in tow the future looks less than promising. With his next film also on the horizon; an adaptation of Don Delilo’s Cosmopolis, we can only hope that the safety net of familiar postmodernist territory can shield him from the looming sense of castration that effectively killed off the careers of Brian de Palma and Paul Verehoven.